Test your cold and flu knowledge

October 11, 2017

Five to 20 percent of the U.S. population get sick every year with the flu.* Fortunately, you have a great care option for when you are ill — Teladoc. Our licensed doctors can diagnose and treat the flu anytime, anywhere. Test your cold and flu knowledge here. And to stay prepared, visit our 2018 Flu HQ for tips and tools to help keep yourself and your family healthy this season.

Test your knowledge here:

Antibiotics are a great treatment option for colds.

ANSWER: Never.

Fact: A cold is a virus with no “cure,” and antibiotics aren’t the way to treat one. You also want to avoid taking an antibiotic when it’s not necessary so that it can be more effective when you do need it.

ANSWER: Never.

Fact: A cold is a virus with no “cure,” and antibiotics aren’t the way to treat one. You also want to avoid taking an antibiotic when it’s not necessary so that it can be more effective when you do need it.

What's the difference between a cold and the flu?

ANSWER: Flu symptoms tend to develop faster and be more severe

Fact: Both colds and the flu are caused by different types of viruses. Flu symptoms — which may include headache, aches, fatigue, and cough — tend to develop quickly after you’re exposed to the virus. Extreme tiredness is more common with the flu and can last a couple of weeks. Colds often begin with a sore throat, followed by stuffy nose, congestion, and cough. In most cases, the symptoms improve in about a week.

ANSWER: Flu symptoms tend to develop faster and be more severe

Fact: Both colds and the flu are caused by different types of viruses. Flu symptoms — which may include headache, aches, fatigue, and cough — tend to develop quickly after you’re exposed to the virus. Extreme tiredness is more common with the flu and can last a couple of weeks. Colds often begin with a sore throat, followed by stuffy nose, congestion, and cough. In most cases, the symptoms improve in about a week.

A person who gets a flu shot is less likely to catch a cold.

ANSWER: False.

Fact: A flu vaccine protects you against specific strains of flu; it does not protect you from other illnesses.

ANSWER: False.

Fact: A flu vaccine protects you against specific strains of flu; it does not protect you from other illnesses.

1.	When is the best time to get a flu shot?

ANSWER: As early as late summer.

Fact: The annual vaccine is often developed as early as late summer, so you can be vaccinated as soon as it’s ready. If you haven’t already gotten your flu shot, you may want to do it by the end of October.

ANSWER: As early as late summer.

Fact: The annual vaccine is often developed as early as late summer, so you can be vaccinated as soon as it’s ready. If you haven’t already gotten your flu shot, you may want to do it by the end of October.

What’s the best way to avoid catching a cold or flu?

ANSWER: Wash your hands often, keep them away from your face, and steer clear of people who are ill

Fact: Since colds and flu are highly contagious, the best way to avoid them is to stay away from people who have them. You also want to wash your hands often to avoid transferring germs from your hands to your eyes, nose, and mouth.

ANSWER: Wash your hands often, keep them away from your face, and steer clear of people who are ill

Fact: Since colds and flu are highly contagious, the best way to avoid them is to stay away from people who have them. You also want to wash your hands often to avoid transferring germs from your hands to your eyes, nose, and mouth.

Which of these ailments can result from a cold?

ANSWER: Sinus infection.

Fact: Sometimes a cold can develop into a sinus infection when bacteria get into your nasal cavities, causing them to become swollen and infected. The best thing to do when you catch a cold is to treat the symptoms to help keep the cold from developing into a worse illness.

ANSWER: Sinus infection.

Fact: Sometimes a cold can develop into a sinus infection when bacteria get into your nasal cavities, causing them to become swollen and infected. The best thing to do when you catch a cold is to treat the symptoms to help keep the cold from developing into a worse illness.

The flu vaccine reduces risk of hospitalization from the flu in what percentage of people age 50+?

ANSWER: 57%.

Fact: According to a 2016 study, more than half of people 50 years and older who got a flu vaccine reduced their risk of being hospitalized.

ANSWER: 57%.

Fact: According to a 2016 study, more than half of people 50 years and older who got a flu vaccine reduced their risk of being hospitalized.

True or false: You should not get the flu vaccine if you’re pregnant.

ANSWER: False.

Fact: Vaccination helps protect women during and after pregnancy, reducing the risk of flu-associated acute respiratory infection by about 50%. And getting vaccinated also protects the baby several months after birth.

ANSWER: False.

Fact: Vaccination helps protect women during and after pregnancy, reducing the risk of flu-associated acute respiratory infection by about 50%. And getting vaccinated also protects the baby several months after birth.

Which group is more vulnerable to serious flu illness than the general population?

ANSWER: Any of these groups

Fact: All of these groups are more vulnerable. Getting a flu vaccination is a responsible choice, especially since it also helps to protect people around you.

ANSWER: Any of these groups

Fact: All of these groups are more vulnerable. Getting a flu vaccination is a responsible choice, especially since it also helps to protect people around you.

If I have a cold, when should I contact my doctor?

ANSWER: Any of these symptoms

Fact: Any of these or other worrisome symptoms, especially if they worsen or drag on after a few days, could be a sign of other complications such as strep throat, bronchitis, or sinus infection and may need additional diagnosis and treatment.

ANSWER: Any of these symptoms

Fact: Any of these or other worrisome symptoms, especially if they worsen or drag on after a few days, could be a sign of other complications such as strep throat, bronchitis, or sinus infection and may need additional diagnosis and treatment.

Teladoc treats a wide variety of non-emergency conditions, including colds, flu, upper respiratory illnesses and more. When you get a minute, just log in to your account and update (or set up) your confidential profile — including your list of medications — so you’ll be ready if you need to reach out to us this season. Be sure to download the app now to take a Teladoc doctor with you everywhere you go this flu season.

For tips and tools to help keep yourself and your family healthy this season:

VISIT THE FLU HQ

 

*www.cdcfoundation.org/businesspulse/flu-prevention-infographic

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